It’s a common misconception that Halloween originated in America, but the tradition was actually started up a bit closer to home.Experts believe that the spooky festival started in Ireland, where the Celtics celebrated Samhain.This Gaelic festival was held after harvest and honoured the souls of the dead to prevent bad luck.It was one of four Gaelic seasonal festivals, commonly observed across Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.Other theories suggest that pagans have been celebrating Halloween for thousands of years, where people dressed up in costumes and built bonfires to scare evil spirits away.Remarkably, evidence of these early Halloween events can be traced back to over 6,000 years ago.

Why do we celebrate Halloween ? Its Christian History

Halloween began to evolve as early as AD 270 from the Celt’s culture in Ireland who practiced a special costume party event the night before their annual feast of “Samhain,” which had a two-fold purpose. The feast was not only a memorial to commemorate their deceased relatives but also a thanksgiving to close the end of the summer season of light and to prepare diligently for entering into the darkness of the long winter season.

Why do we celebrate Halloween ? Why do children go trick-or-treating?

 Why do we celebrate Halloween

The phrase trick-or-treat was first used in America in 1927, with the traditions brought over to America by immigrants. Guising gave way to threatening pranks in exchange for sweets.After a brief lull during the sugar rations in World War Two, Halloween became a widespread holiday that revolved around children, with newly built suburbs providing a safe place for children to roam free.Costumes became more adventurous in Victorian ages, they were influenced by gothic themes in literature, and dressed as bats and ghosts or what seemed exotic, such as an Egyptian pharoah.Later, costumes became influenced  by pop culture and became more sexualised in the 1970s.Many of us have fallen victim to a scary Halloween prank, or even played the nasty trickster ourselves.

Halloween costumes date back to ancient Samhain celebrations, where Druids would dress up in costumes of animal heads and skins.Around the turn of the first millennium, the church began to celebrate All Souls’ Day on November 2. During festivities, the poor would visit the houses of wealthier families and receive pastries called soul cakes in exchange for a promise to pray for the homeowners’ dead relatives, a practice known as souling.This evolved into guising – where young people in Scotland and Ireland would dress up in costume and perform songs, poems or jokes in exchange for fruit and nut. The tradition was taken to the US by immigrants in the early 1900s, where it became known as trick-or-treating.

 Why do we celebrate Halloween ? Why do people carve pumpkins?

The pumpkin tradition also dates back to Samhain, where Gaels would carve turnips to ward off spirits.It is believed that Irish immigrants who travelled to the US in the 1840s began carving pumpkins as they were more readily available than turnips.

 Why do we celebrate Halloween

Why do we celebrate Halloween eve and The American Halloween tradition of “trick-or-treating” probably dates back to the early All Souls’ Day parades in England. Why do we celebrate Halloween , During the festivities, poor citizens would beg for food and families would give them pastries called “soul cakes” in return for their promise to pray for the family’s dead relatives. The distribution of soul cakes was encouraged by the church as a way to replace the ancient practice of leaving food and wine for roaming spirits. The practice, which was referred to as “going a-souling” was eventually taken up by children who would visit the houses in their neighborhood and be given ale, food, and money.

The tradition of dressing in costume for Halloween has both European and Celtic roots. Hundreds of years ago, winter was an uncertain and frightening time. Food supplies often ran low and, for the many people afraid of the dark, the short days of winter were full of constant worry. On Why do we celebrate Halloween , when it was believed that ghosts came back to the earthly world, people thought that they would encounter ghosts if they left their homes. To avoid being recognized by these ghosts, people would wear masks when they left their homes after dark so that the ghosts would mistake them for fellow spirits. On Halloween, to keep ghosts away from their houses, people would place bowls of food outside their homes to appease the ghosts and prevent them from attempting to enter.

Why do we celebrate Halloween

Halloween has always been a holiday filled with mystery, magic and superstition. It began as a Celtic end-of-summer festival during which people felt especially close to deceased relatives and friends. For these friendly spirits, they set places at the dinner table, left treats on doorsteps and along the side of the road and lit candles to help loved ones find their way back to the spirit world. Today’s Halloween ghosts are often depicted as more fearsome and malevolent, and our customs and superstitions are scarier too. We avoid crossing paths with black cats, afraid that they might bring us bad luck. This idea has its roots in the Middle Ages, when many people believed that witches avoided detection by turning themselves into cats. We try not to walk under ladders for the same reason. This superstition may have come from the ancient Egyptians, who believed that triangles were sacred; it also may have something to do with the fact that walking under a leaning ladder tends to be fairly unsafe. And around Halloween, especially, we try to avoid breaking mirrors, stepping on cracks in the road or spilling salt.

Why do we celebrate Halloween

But what about the Halloween traditions and beliefs that today’s trick-or-treaters have forgotten all about? Many of these obsolete rituals focused on the future instead of the past and the living instead of the dead. Why do we celebrate Halloween In particular, many had to do with helping young women identify their future husbands and reassuring them that they would someday—with luck, by next Halloween—be married. In 18th-century Ireland, a matchmaking cook might bury a ring in her mashed potatoes on Halloween night, hoping to bring true love to the diner who found it. In Scotland, fortune-tellers recommended that an eligible young woman name a hazelnut for each of her suitors and then toss the nuts into the fireplace. The nut that burned to ashes rather than popping or exploding, the story went, represented the girl’s future husband. (Why do we celebrate Halloween, In some versions of this legend, confusingly, the opposite was true: The nut that burned away symbolized a love that would not last.) Another tale had it that if a young woman ate a sugary concoction made out of walnuts, hazelnuts and nutmeg before bed on Halloween night she would dream about her future husband. Young women tossed apple-peels over their shoulders, hoping that the peels would fall on the floor in the shape of their future husbands’ initials; tried to learn about their futures by peering at egg yolks floating in a bowl of water; and stood in front of mirrors in darkened rooms, holding candles and looking over their shoulders for their husbands’ faces. Other rituals were more competitive. At some Halloween parties, the first guest to find a burr on a chestnut-hunt would be the first to marry; at others, the first successful apple-bobber would be the first down the aisle.